Day 2 of Women in The World

Continuing off of my last post regarding my time at the Women In The World Summit, I wanted to keep pulling in memories and points from my live tweeting. The summit itself made me realize that nothing is impossible. Here I am in New York City, coming here from a very small town. But none of that matters. Some positions seemed forever out of reach when I was growing up, but I’ve come to think more along the lines now of “why not me?”. Why can’t I be the one to do something? There is no reason. Of course it comes with a lot of hard work, and there are people out there who already start off miles ahead of you if they have the right background? But the support system I’ve developed while volunteering in this city makes me believe that I could be the one making a difference someday. This conference in particular made me think hard of what I want to do. I love writing, and I love learning about the world and how to make the biggest positive impact to give people a better life. All people. As of right now, after listening to Nancy Pelosi, Madeleine K. Albright and Hillary Clinton, I think I would love to study international relations/foreign policy in graduate school and go on to write policy in the U.S. for foreign affairs. Eventually I would also like to go into Academia and teach at a college level to continue my research, travel, and motivate future generations. Here is a continuation from the last post that got me thinking more along these lines.

More inspiring women speak at Women In The World

First of all, especially with the upcoming election even here in the United States, voting is extremely important. One point was brought up that “bad things happen when good people don’t vote”. Regarding women, this is even more important today when we are trying and close to getting more women into office, and also to stay fair on the issues up for debate that affect women especially. It’s important to stand together. I’ve never been one to be a strong feminist, but at the same time there are situations that just make sense. Women, not always, but overall tend to be a bit more sensitive and better at listening. These two characteristics are very important in trying to make a better world for everyone and not strive for power. But it’s not easy. “In our generation now we’re told there’s no longer barriers (being a woman) so when we hit them we think it’s our fault,” said Shelby Knox. The media often makes it appear that gender equality has been achieved, but in most cases that’s not true. Another issue is that women are often the toughest critics of other women, including those running for office. Instead of being supportive, there is this tendency to pull them apart, and without that support there’s no chance of taking steps forward. Jane Harman mentioned traits that women have off the resume that are important for leadership positions: instinct to protect, and trying to resolve problems.

I found many other points made by Jane Harman particularly interesting. She also reminded the audience that the areas with the most violence also has the most victims, who need help and not more harm. Therefore, it’s not best to attack a neighborhood, but to actually find the people causing the problems. This can be best done with the help of the victims since they are likely to cooperate, instead of angering them by upsetting their lives even further. “We must build trust with communities or you won’t know. They won’t help you find 1 bad apple,” Harman said.  She then mentioned the importance of women in building up communities. “If you have a secure woman you have a secure child, a secure family, a secure society.”

Another panel spoke on Afghanistan being the most dangerous place to be a woman. A solution that came up, which I always found to be an important avenue to follow, is focusing on the men. Women already know that they don’t want violence against them, rape, or to be less than any man. Therefore, the energy for change should be focused on teaching men and boys from the start to respect women since ultimately, in circumstances where these occurrences are common, can be diminished from the beginning.

As a panel opened up on murder and machismo in Latin America, another strong and incredible young woman told her story as she was personally effected by sex trafficking and child prostitution in Mexico. This issue is still extremely common today both in Mexico and across into the United States border. See my earlier post on solutions from a speaker at the Amnesty International Office.

Another favorite session of mine was with Nancy Pelosi, a person I have always admired. Her focus began with the recent debate of women’s reproductive rights. I found an important point she made of remembering that being a woman is not a pre-existing condition, and should not be treated as that. Which is why it makes sense for health coverage to include areas needed for the health of a woman. Valerie Jarrett later spoke at the summit bringing up the issues again in regards to her work with President Obama saying that he “was always surrounded by women and values them having a seat at the table.”

After much serious discussion on some very heavy issues, the summit moved to a lighter note with the Soccket Rocket. This was invented by two women. It is a soccer ball that harnesses kinetic energy while being played with. The energy is then used later to power a light in communities that don’t have electricity and use kerosene lamps which cause many health problems. Now that is innovative!

Soccket Rocket

Day 2 wrapped up with Lynsey Addario speaking of her photojournalism in Libya and being captured by rebels. A job of tremendous courage that I can hardly comprehend as I sat there in amazement of what she had faced to tell their story. It looks like she has no plans of stopping anytime soon. Charlie Rose even asked her “You now have a 10 week old baby, are you going to keep doing this?” To which she responded, “would you ask a man that question?” Going into the Arab spring, an uplifting quote came up to end the day. “There is no spring without flowers, there is no Arab Spring without women.” And with that, Anna Netrebko left us with her amazing voice, and we left anxious for the final day of the summit.

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2 thoughts on “Day 2 of Women in The World

  1. Pingback: What Did I Do in 2012? « Global Thoughts

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