NYC Pride Parade Filled with Energy After Win Against DOMA!

Ever since I was young and growing up through school, I never understood why gay marriage did not exist. In my eyes it was simple: these two people love each other, it isn’t affecting anyone else anyways, and then I would think of it on a more personal level. What if I was gay and one of my dreams in life was still to get married just as it is in my actual life? Why should a person be denied this important aspect of life, especially after going through a possibly more difficult life because of how people treat them only for being themselves?

These values that took hold of me from a young age, followed me even up until today. Though of course now they have become more complicated as I have gotten involved in the human rights, political, and religious sides of the argument. But why does it have to be complicated? In the end, it really still should be as simple as how my 12-year-old self saw it. However, that is the country we live in. Finally, last week, the Supreme Court struck down DOMA (Defense of Marriage Act), which I have been fighting as part of Amnesty International for years. It was such a huge day, even though really, it’s just common sense. The United States is founded on the separation of church and state, why that is such a difficult concept to understand I will never know. Not only will the marriage ceremonies be able to take place (where states allow), as I always hoped for growing up, but many more aspects will take hold that my younger self didn’t know too much about yet. Gay couples are finally recognized by the federal government for being who they are. So, if they are in a state that allows (which hopefully this will get the ball rolling for the other states) married gay couples they will have the same benefits as straight, married couples, making a huge difference for the rights of so many people! I’m talking, life changing for the better. And what will it do for people who aren’t happy? Absolutely nothing. In fact, those people’s lives wouldn’t change either way.

I’m sure you’ve heard most of the arguments and details by now. I want to focus on the celebration. The New York City Pride Parade, one of my favorite days of the year in NYC, was of course incredible. A day of equality, acceptance, love, and happiness for a huge win after a long fight for equal rights. It was the first time that as I volunteered for Amnesty International we didn’t have the DOMA petitions. Instead, we participated in the Pride Festival where we collected signatures to pass legislation for a federal law that would make it illegal to discriminate against students based on sexual orientation. Currently, it’s illegal to discriminate based on factors such as gender and race, but believe it or not, not sexual orientation. We also collected signatures on postcards to send to South Africa in solidarity with a woman who was murdered for being gay and advocating for LGBT rights.

Jon, myself, Jacquie, and Chris collected nearly 200 signatures in 2 hours for the proposed anti-discrimination legislation.

Jon, myself, Jacquie, and Chris collected nearly 200 signatures in 2 hours for the proposed anti-discrimination legislation.

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Wall of solidarity postcards for South Africa.

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After volunteering we went over to enjoy the Pride Parade itself. The energy after the win against DOMA was incredible. Everyone was filled with hope as there was finally evidence that when you fight hard for what’s right, change CAN happen and nothing is impossible. It took way too long, but we as a country have finally taken a step in the right direction of equality. Enjoy a few photos of the inspiring celebrations!

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