Why Ask Why? A Question Worth Spreading. (Ted X Teen 2013)

I was so excited to have the opportunity to attend Ted X Teen on behalf of She’s The First this past weekend. I was immediately brought to a good mood to see all of the ambitious, open minded, and driven teenagers (many with their moms and dads) as the check in process began. I took advantage of this by giving out a few She’s The First cards and talking about the cause hoping to fire up some more campus chapters while all of this positive, young energy was in one place. I made my way to the authors and got their books signed, while also chatting with them about the organization and why I was there. They were all so friendly and interested. I’m especially excited to learn more about Andrew Jenks, who swore we had met before and had a mild obsession with my name.

I always love conferences like this because it’s an automatic re-up to my inspiration and motivation, which is needed when day-to-day life can start to push it down. Chelsea Clinton was hosting, and although I did not get to meet her, I still swear we are destined to be best friends. Hopefully someday she will realize this as well and I will become a family friend of the Clintons. Anyways! Chelsea kicked off the event with some amazing Teddy Roosevelt quotes and inspiration:

 

Chelsea Clinton shares Teddy Roosevelt quote.

 

Chelsea Clinton then shared a Clinton family saying:

“The worst thing that could happen is you get caught trying.”

She advised for those wanting to step forward and make a difference:

1. Start where you are. What is one thing you can dedicate your life to? What makes you mad? What doesn’t make sense? Society often creates unnecessary fine lines between humility vs. self defeat and arrogance vs. integrity.

2. Be brave enough to be second. Don’t be afraid to identify what works and build from it.

3. Because I can I should, and because I should I will.

Chelsea Clinton hosts Ted X Teen

Chelsea Clinton hosts Ted X Teen

Caine Monroy, a 10 year old who created a cardboard arcade, left us with these words that I loved, as they reminded me to stay true to my roots of my young self. Sometimes those times were simpler and it’s hard to see through the cloudiness of growing up.

“When you were 10, what did your imagination tell you to do?”

Caine Monroy bult a cardboard arcade.

Caine Monroy built a cardboard arcade.

Joseph Peter, who created the Book of Happiness, reminded us of the power to smile, find happiness, and remember the happiness of others. About reflecting on the good of the world, rather than the bad we see in the media. To use a smile to peer into the heart and soul of a person regardless of culture and language, and to build bridges with it. He found a different Africa than what you see in the media, which I also found while I was there. One of love, inspiration, and happiness. He began giving away his images for free, trying to do anything to spread this realization. Although he struggled at the beginning, he learned that, “disappointment causes us to come back with something better, different, truer to self.”

“How beautiful is our common humanity?”

Joseph Peter

Joseph Peter

The UN has even made March 20th the International Day of Happiness. There will be a week of celebration that everyone should take part in to reflect on what makes you happy and changing the world.

Myself in front of Joseph Peter's wall of happiness.

Myself in front of Joseph Peter’s wall of happiness.

Kuha’o Case was one of my favorite speakers of the day. A piano/organ prodigy from Hawaii, he is blind, and came with an important message for everyone.

“I see no limits, sight may be more limiting. Your eyes haven’t seen it being done, you don’t know it CAN be done. Don’t allow yourself to be blinded by sight. Don’t ask why, rather, dare to see no limits and ask, why not?”

This compared with a favorite Nelson Mandela quote of mine that he also shared.

“It always seems impossible until it’s done.”

Kuah'o Case

Kuah’o Case

Case also reminded us of our untapped potential. That our goals, dreams, and ambitions do not have to be within perceived boundaries.

Kelvin Doe, AKA DJ Focus, from Sierra Leone, would pick up scraps from a garbage fill on his way home from school every day. At night he would build things..beginning with radios and moving on to batteries, an audio mixer, and eventually having a full radio station. It made me think of all the high tech things we have in the world, and all of the “trash” people throw away. Do we really need to be constantly creating from new materials when we can use and be innovative with what we already have like Kelvin was? At the age of 15, Kelvin was able to come to the U.S. to be a visiting practitioner at MIT and even lecture at Harvard. He is pursuing engineering, and joked that his YouTube video has over 4 million views, nearly twice as many as President Obama’s acceptance speech. Though his story was one of inspiration and success, Chelsea Clinton reminded us of something I’ve heard and seen too many times.

“Talent, passion, and perseverance are everywhere, but opportunity, resources, and mentorship are not.”

Kelvin Doe AKA DJ Focus

Kelvin Doe AKA DJ Focus

Tania Luna shared her study of the psychology of surprise. How when you are younger you tend to be open to surprise, but as you get older you try to hide from it since it can make you feel out of control of a situation. We try not to look naive and vulnerable. However, this holds us back from learning and changing to something that may surprise us (a common factor to the existence of stereotypes or not accepting what might be outside of the norm.) She also mentioned how schools award students for knowing more so than asking to know, and so they often never actually find out. She encouraged us to step outside of our comfort zone, allow ourselves to be surprised, actively choose to be vulnerable and ask:

“I don’t know, but I wonder.”

Chelsea Clinton with her husband and Tania Luna

Chelsea Clinton with her husband and Tania Luna

Maria Toorpakai Wazir, from Pakistan, was fortunate to  have a father who saw women as equals. She dressed and was renamed as a boy to have equal opportunities. She grew up with anger toward these cultural norms still in existence, and eventually channeled her negative energy into weight lifting. Once her true gender was discovered, she was bullied by adults and even threatened by the Taliban. She spent 3 years training her room and e-mailing colleges. Finally, Jonathan Power of Canada replied and gave her the opportunity to become a globally successful Squash player.

“You will find a way, don’t give up, life is waiting for you at the end. Fly as an eagle, don’t be afraid of wind or rocky mountains, they challenge and shape you.”

Maria Toorpakai Wazir

Maria Toorpakai Wazir

As a huge fan of Nelson Mandela, I was extremely anxious to hear his grandson, Ndaba Mandela, speak. He shared how he learned to honor a legacy by learning from the past and building, but charting your own path. He is working to change the perception of Africa.

“Poverty, disease, and war exist, but many positive things happen and are ignored by the media. By shining a light on these, people can empower themselves and inspire their communities.”

The majority of African people live in rural areas, but to not have access to education or extra curricular activities. However, since that is where most of the people are, that is where the post potential is as well. The power of technology, and the Mandela Global Digital Platform, has started to allow people to share what they are doing for their communities.

Ndaba Mandela (granson of Nelson Mandela)

Ndaba Mandela (grandson of Nelson Mandela)

“The story begins with Nelson Mandela, but ends with others.”

He then recognized young people in the audience who have started amazing movements, and gave them the credit they deserved, he felt, as much or more than he does. He encouraged us to use Nelson Mandela Day to fund the best, sustainable way to give back.

Talia Storm shared her story of discovery thanks to Elton John and pushed us to #discoverurstorm.

“Be ready to seize your moment.”

Talia Storm

Talia Storm

Kris Bronner, founder of UnReal, created a candy without artificial colors, high fructose corn syrup, less sugar, and more protein and fiber. Seeing a young person accomplish this made me think, why is our government fighting over how much we are allowed to consume and not spending more time and resources creating products like Kris’ instead? They could learn a few lessons from Chris, such as to think, why can’t it be different? Think big, but allow yourself to remain naive. It’s not enough to do what’s easy, you have to do what’s right.

“Integrity is doing the right thing, even when no one is watching.”

Kris Bronner of UnReal

Kris Bronner of UnReal

Amaryllis Fox had a life that was hard for me to imagine, taking a risk to move somewhere on a whim with no money and no plan. She found herself near the Thailand/Burma border working with refugees, many of whom were injured from land mines and military regimes. Her experience showed the benefits of acting by instinct and intuition.

“I couldn’t have found my life at the end of a pro and con list.”

Amaryllis Fox

Amaryllis Fox

Sophie Umazi, of Kenya, was nearly killed during the 2007 elections when her light skin made her seen as an “enemy tribe.” When the elections of 2013 began, she knew she had to do something to help avoid this from happening again to herself or others. She began the “I Am Kenyan” campaign, where the world shared photos of themselves saying “I am Kenyan” to show that we are all humanity and that the world stands together with an rea that needs it. We are all citizens of the world. On a smaller scale, she believes that her country must identify as Kenyan first, before politics, ethnicity, tribe, etc. I believe this is a powerful lesson that the U.S. should learn as well.

“I believe we are all human beings, not just citizens of our countries.”

This is an idea I have always ALWAYS lived by, and it gave me goosebumps hearing someone else bring it forward as well. The elections in Kenya, though some violence occurred, were overall peaceful and democratic. They even had 88% voter turn out, which is much higher than the U.S. has possibly ever head.

Sophie Umazi of "I am Kenyan"

Sophie Umazi of “I am Kenyan”

Finally, there was Dylan Vecchione. Through his experience in his project working to save reefs, he shared with us the importance of asking passionate questions. To prompt, research, encourage work, and find puzzles that must be solved. Letting questions lead to new thinking will inevitably lead to making new discoveries.

Dylan Vecchione

Dylan Vecchione

The entire day made for a wonderful Saturday. I even ran into Omekongo, who I had seen perform at the Stanford Stand conference I attended in 2011, and spend lunch chatting about my own thoughts and goals, while hearing input from someone I admired so highly. I’m reminded of all the people doing good in the world among all of the bad that is constantly shoved into our attention. But I think anyone can take the lessons that these young people have already learned, ask why whenever possible, and step confidently in the direction of your dreams. Happy International Happiness Week!

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One Day On Earth

Last week I went with Anita to the Quad Theatre to see One Day On Earth. The movie was filmed in every single country of the world on the same day. The film makers took all of this footage, edited and compiled for an insane amount of hours, to show the world what was going on in each country on October 10, 2012 (10-10-10). I truly wish everyone could watch this movie. To see and be reminded that everyone on Earth is living, and often struggling at the same time as you might be leading a more comfortable life. It’s a reminder just how many people are in this world, but yet how we are all similar in many ways, but living a wide range of different lives. Through the footage, there were certain themes captured along the way:

  • Love/Marriage
  • Death
  • Trash and Waste
  • Birthdays
  • War
  • Animals/Species
  • Extinction
  • Imprisonment
  • Education Religion

These were themes that occurred in some way in basically every country. It was very emotional to watch for me in a number of ways. One, was in the way that it showed how love is universal and all the different but still beautiful ways people feel and express it. Another was struggle, and how unfair it is what some people have to live through just by the pure chance of where and what they were born into. Though there are different cultures and practices, these themes often come through to many of us. The media often portrays a certain group of people in the same light over and over again. Eventually we assume that for example, everyone in Africa lives in shacks, everyone in the Middle East has terrorist tendencies, that certain religions are better or more “right” than others. I enjoyed this movie because it didn’t stay on track with the media’s agenda. It showed the world in a way that covered a lot of average people. I think if people saw it, those in the U.S. that only watch the news might be surprised that in countries they know less about, people are living similarly to them. Therefore, instead of dehumanizing a situation where human rights abuses are occurring, they may be reminded that people just like them are being hurt or sometimes killed, that it is real, and that it is just as painful even if it’s happening far away and not right in front of their eyes.

Now, even though I think it’s important, sustainability and the “green movement” has not been an area I have focused on or studied as much as human rights. However, this film really caught my attention. One quote that was used, which I think will always stick with me is “we [humans] need nature, nature doesn’t need us.” Which is absolutely true. There aren’t really plants or species out there that rely on humans to survive, but without those things, humans in turn would not be able to live and grow. It made me think of it in a way that needs to be more appreciated. There was even an organization highlighted, and a representative spoke after the film, that takes trash and turns it into novelties. For example, furniture that could still very much be used and there are many out there who are in need. There are billions of people in the world, what we throw away is insane and the amount of landfills is one of those topics that is painful to think about so we often block it out of our minds.

Another area that I know should always be remembered, but often forgotten in day to day life is the importance of living life to the fullest and doing what you enjoy and what makes you happy. I remember when I saw Nick Kristof speak and he mentioned that those of us in that room won the lottery of life. I’ve thought about that more than ever. Sure, everyone has their struggles and their problems. But the atrocities that millions and millions of people face in this world makes being a middle (or in some cases even low) income, average American makes you in the minority of the world who are lucky enough to have such a privileged life. But, anything could happen in a moment’s time, and so no matter what society things (as long as you aren’t harming yourself or anyone else) don’t let the thoughts of other’s run your life. You have to make it yours, or you truly will never be able to enjoy it the way you should be.

There will be another film that was created on 11-11-11 coming out. One Day On Earth is also an organization as well which I encourage you to take a look at. They also have many partner organizations that have helped them through their journey. I know Anita and I laughed, cried, and got goose bumps multiple times through the 1 hour and 30 minute film. Please check it out.